New method enables sequencing of fetal genomes using only maternal blood sample

New method enables sequencing of fetal genomes using only maternal blood sample

Stanford School of Medicine | July 4, 2012 | By Krista Conger

Researchers at Stanford University have for the first time sequenced the genome of an unborn baby using only a blood sample from the mother.

The findings from the new approach, published July 4 in Nature, are related to research that was reported a month ago from the University of Washington. That research used a technique previously developed at Stanford to sequence a fetal genome using a blood sample from the mother, plus DNA samples from both the mother and father.

The whole genome sequencing in the new Stanford study, however, did not require DNA from the father — a significant advantage when a child’s true paternity may not be known (a situation estimated to affect as many as one in 10 births in this country) or the father may be unavailable or unwilling to provide a sample. The technique brings fetal genetic testing one step closer to routine clinical use.

“We’re interested in identifying conditions that can be treated before birth, or immediately after,” said Stephen Quake, PhD, the Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and professor of bioengineering and of applied physics. “Without such diagnoses, newborns with treatable metabolic or immune system disorders suffer until their symptoms become noticeable and the causes determined.” Quake is the senior author of the research. Former graduate student H. Christina Fan, PhD, now a senior scientist at ImmuMetrix, and current graduate student Wei Gu are co-first authors of the article.

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One Response to New method enables sequencing of fetal genomes using only maternal blood sample

  1. emmageraln says:

    Reblogged this on emmageraln.

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