Apple iPad Helps Give Voice To Those Who Can’t Speak

April 5, 2011

Apple iPad Helps Give Voice To Those Who Can’t Speak

FOX 8 (Cleveland) | April 5, 2011 | By Debra Alfarone

When you think of Apple’s top-selling “it” product, the iPad, you probably think of long lines for the product at Apple stores, and maybe even the wealthy techno-yuppies that carry it around, but the iPad is also being used in a more altruistic manner to speak for those who can’t.

Speech therapists at Lincoln Community School in Bayonne, New Jersey have been using an iPad complete with Prologuo2go software (http://www.proloquo2go.com) to teach autistic children, many of whom don’t speak, to communicate.

Speech therapist Carmella Barbieri works closely with the children, “It’s great, so he can express a sentence to his teacher or to his peers and can communicate with others through devices like this.”

The device can spell out commands and requests and speak them aloud, such as “I need apple juice'” or “I need to go to the bathroom.”

Principal Dennis Degnan says the iPad has been a huge success, “It’s automatic feedback and it makes them feel good about themselves.”

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Websites link to milk from another mother

February 21, 2011

Websites link to milk from another mother

Cincinnati.com | February 21, 2011 | By John Johnson

Susie Anderson supplements the diet of her 3-year-old son, Roman, with 15 ounces of donated breast milk every day.

The 31-year-old Erlanger mother believes Roman, who must be fed through a tube because of a genetic disease called spinal muscular atrophy, is healthier because of it. She plans to continue those feedings “as long as I can keep getting donated milk.”

Her main donor is a Fort Wright mother, but Anderson also has received breast milk from women in Fairfax, Taylor Mill and Elizabethtown, Ky., all of whom she met through the Internet.

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Local Artist Overcomes Tragedy To Memorialize Children

January 27, 2011

Local Artist Overcomes Tragedy To Memorialize Children

NBC4i.com | January 27, 2011 | By Cabot Rea

Vodpod videos no longer available.

CENTRAL OHIO — At 9 months of old, a high fever and strange bruising sent Samantha Bennett to the hospital.

With no answers, she was transferred to a pediatric hospital where the delayed diagnosis of bacterial meningitis proved devastating.

Bennett lost parts of all her fingers, half of one foot and that was not all.

“I am covered in skin grafts. My nose was almost gone, but I’m so grateful they saved my life,” she said.

Bennett underwent surgery after surgery, spending up to six months in the hospital at a time.

It was during that time, with nothing else to do, that she developed the love of drawing.

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Gift to grandson now helps other children

January 6, 2011

Gift to grandson now helps other children

Newsnet5.com (ABC) | January 6, 2011| By Alicia Booth

SHAKER HEIGHTS, Ohio – Ron Soroka was racking his brain trying to figure out a way for his young grandson to enjoy trains, but little Jack’s spinal muscular atrophy prevented him from playing with toys other kids could.

Then, an idea came to Soroka out of nowhere.

“One morning, believe it or not, at three in the morning, I woke up and I said you know, I have an old N guage (small train and train track) in the basement, I’m gonna dig it up,” he said.

Nine months later, Soroka had constructed an elaborate train activity table that his grandson could access from his wheelchair. It was specially-designed to help Jack with his motor skills while having fun.

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At Licking Valley, wheelchair doesn’t stop sixth-grader from continuing Torbert tradition

December 26, 2010

At Licking Valley, wheelchair doesn’t stop sixth-grader from continuing Torbert tradition

Newark Advocate | December 25, 2010 | By Dave Weidig

HANOVER — Licking Valley’s “director of basketball operations” is the third generation of Torberts to grace the Panthers’ boys program.

That’s what first-year Valley head coach Todd Torbert affectionately calls his 12-year-old son, Cade, and the term fits. The Licking Valley Middle School sixth grader has a hand in nearly everything involved with the Panthers — despite the fact he gets around in a motorized wheelchair.

Cade has spinal muscular atrophy, a form of muscular dystrophy in which the motor neurons in his spine degenerate, causing the muscles to weaken and fail. He’s had five back surgeries and has rods in his back, but fortunately, should have to have just one more surgery.

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College Students Help Non-Verbal Children Communicate Many For The First Time

November 23, 2010

College Students Help Non-Verbal Children Communicate Many For The First Time

Medical News Today | November 23, 2010

Students majoring in communication disorders at Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio, are ahead of their peers nationwide who are working toward careers in speech pathology because of a one-of-a-kind program that gives the undergraduates more hands-on experience than most graduate students in the field.

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Dinner To Raise Funds For Van

November 16, 2010

Dinner To Raise Funds For Van

Springfield News-Sun | November 16, 2010

By Whitney DeGroat, Staff Writer

Family’s vehicle needs to be modified to lift wheelchair for girl with spinal muscular atrophy.